Forex hedging: Hedging is a risk management technique where a trader can offset potential losses by taking opposite positions in the market. In Forex, this can be done by taking two opposite positions on the same currency pair (e.g. by opening a long trade and a short trade on the GBP/USD currency pair), or by taking opposite positions on two correlated currencies.
Imagine a trader who expects interest rates to rise in the U.S. compared to Australia while the exchange rate between the two currencies (AUD/USD) is 0.71 (it takes $0.71 USD to buy $1.00 AUD). The trader believes higher interest rates in the U.S. will increase demand for USD, and therefore the AUD/USD exchange rate will fall because it will require fewer, stronger USD to buy an AUD.
Rule #5:  Keep it simple. Newcomers tend to load up on every indicator or analysis tool available. The result is chaos and paralysis. Simple is best. Focus on one pair with a few tools to guide you. If you have three losers in a row, leave the market for a while. There is always a new opportunity around the corner. Never trade when your mind is in turmoil, and keep a journal to review accurately what you did right and what you did wrong. Learn, learn, learn!!!
One strategy that is a simple forex trading system is following the daily or weekly trend. Review the daily and weekly charts and find a trend that seems well supported and get in. The one caveat about this particular type of trading is that your moves that look small on the chart can span 100's of pips. This means that you need to trade small. Use a conservative allocation when you buy in and allow your trade to develop a bit. Set a reasonable stop and plan out a target. Beginners find this strategy easy because they don't need to watch the market constantly, they can trade when they have time.
Any forex transaction that settles for a date later than spot is considered a "forward." The price is calculated by adjusting the spot rate to account for the difference in interest rates between the two currencies. The amount of adjustment is called "forward points." The forward points reflect only the interest rate differential between two markets. They are not a forecast of how the spot market will trade at a date in the future. 

Great article, as others have already said. Thanks for taking the effort. I have a question left. With "The ‘Indecision Doji’ Candle Breakout Trading Strategy", do you recommend that the the low/high of the Doji will be broken in the next candle? Or can it be the 2nd or 3rd as well. If feels like the moment is over by then, though the breakout can still happen of course. What do you recommend?
Answer: The best trading strategy blog is the Trading Strategy Guides Blog. This is because they have a commitment to quality and excellence in their articles and posts. They use simple step by step instructions that make even the most demanding strategies easy to trade. The reports include the highest quality images. They also have videos about each plan to make the learning that much better. Finally, they put out an infographic for each strategy to indeed make the learning experience complete. 

A good eBook reader ought to be set up. It will be useful to have a great eBook reader in order to really have a good reading experience and high quality eBook display. You can even make use of free software that could offer the readers that have many functions to the reader than only a simple platform to read the desirable eBooks. You can also save all your eBooks in the library that's also provided to the user by the software program and have a great display of all your eBooks as well as access them by identifying them from their specific cover. Aside from offering a place to save all your precious eBooks, the eBook reader software even provide you with a lot of characteristics as a way to boost your eBook reading experience in relation to the standard paper books. You may also improve your eBook reading encounter with help of options furnished by the software program including the font size, full display mode, the certain variety of pages that need to be displayed at once and also alter the color of the backdrop.
Leverage: Leverage is capital provided by a Forex broker to bolster their client's trading volume. For example, if you use a 1:10 rate of leverage and have $1,000 in your trading account, you can trade $10,000 worth of a currency pair. If the trade is successful, leverage will maximise your profits by a factor of 10. However, please note that leverage also multiplies your losses to the same degree, so it should be used with caution. If your account balance falls below $0, you may trigger a broker's negative balance protection settings (if trading with an ESMA regulated broker), which will result in the trade being closed. Fortunately, this means that your balance cannot move below $0, so you will not be in debt to the broker.

For trading purposes, the first currency listed in the pair is always the directional currency on a forex price chart. If you pull up a chart of the EUR/USD, and the price is moving higher, it means the EUR is moving higher relative to the USD. If the price on the chart is falling, then the EUR is declining in value relative to the USD. The attached chart shows this. 
The term CFD stands for 'Contract For Difference', and it is a contract used to represent the movement in the prices of financial instruments. In terms of Forex, this means that rather than purchasing and selling large amounts of currency, you can profit on price movements without owning the asset itself. Along with Forex, CFDs are also available on shares, indices, bonds, commodities and cryptocurrencies. In every case, they allow you to trade on the price movements of these instruments without having to purchase them.
Use a stop loss: A stop loss is tool that traders use to limit their potential losses. Simply put, it is the price level at which you will close a trade that isn't moving in your favour, thereby preventing any further losses as the market continues to move in that direction. You can also use a stop loss to conserve any profits you might have already made - the tool to achieve this is known as a 'trailing' stop loss, which follows the direction of the market.  
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